Category Archives: Diet

Maximize Your Diet with Superfoods: What Makes a Superfood Super?

Before you run into the boredom of a diet rut, take a look at some new foods or revisit some of old favorites. The truth behind these foods may startle you.

Quinoa

Originating in the Andes of South America, quinoa offers a protein punch for a calorie bargain. While quinoa is generally employed as a grain, it is actually a “pseudocereal” packed with protein. In 100 grams (uncooked), this superfood contains 370 calories, 14 grams of protein, 7 grams of dietary fiber, and more than half of the daily dietary requirements of Potassium and Magnesium.

A great option for gluten-free cooking and for protein deficits in a vegetarian diet, quinoa makes a great compliment to a meal as a rice-substitute.

Lentils

Rich in dietary fiber and protein, lentils are a staple in any nutrient-rich diet. Available in a variety of colors, including yellow, green, brown and black, lentils, per 100 grams, uncooked, provide an incredible 31 grams of dietary fiber and 26 grams of protein for only 1 gram of fat and 350 calories. This super-legume also provides more than 60% of the daily nutritional requirement of Thiamine and Iron.

Try this superfood with a slow-cooker recipe or as a substitute for meat for a hearty and nutritionally charged meal.

Broccoli

A common vegetable on American dinner tables, broccoli is argued by many to be a “negative-calorie food” offering a great source of Vitamins C, K, and A. Per 100 grams, broccoli provides 2.6 grams of dietary fiber and 2.8 grams of protein for only 30 calories and 0.3 grams of fat!

In order to preserve its nutritional punch, try broccoli raw by adding it to a salad or an accompaniment to the main dish.

Spinach

While this superfood does have some negative press with respect to its link to kidney stones, spinach is another nutritious food reported to be a “negative-calorie food” and employed as a source of iron for those suffering with iron-deficiency. Spinach also provides an excellent source of protein and iron. For 100 grams of raw spinach, benefit from 2.2 grams of dietary fiber, 2.2 grams of protein, 460% of the daily nutritional requirement of Vitamin K, and 22% of the daily nutritional requirement of Iron for just 20 calories and 0.4 grams of fat.

Add some spinach to your dinner by employing it as a great addition to a basic salad or to cooked quinoa.

Acai

This berry, harvested in the Brazilian Rainforest, is a nutritional powerhouse, packed with 4 grams of protein and 5 grams of dietary fiber per 3.5 ounce serving. Acai is also loaded with anthocyanins postulated to aid in fighting aging, high cholesterol, heart disease, strokes and colon cancer. The acai berry’s cost in calories? Only 154 calories per 3.5 ounce serving!

Commonly consumed as a juice or a smoothie, try this amazing berry blended with a banana and a splash of orange juice for a tasty and healthy breakfast.